Categories
Workshops and Presentations

USACE’s EWN Initiative Conducted a Short Course Titled, “Engineering With Nature for Sustainable Estuaries” in Association with the Restore America’s Estuaries 2018 Summit in Long Beach, California

December 13, 2018

On December 13, 2018, the USACE’s EWN initiative conducted a short course titled, “Engineering With Nature® for Sustainable Estuaries” in association with the Restore America’s Estuaries 2018 Summit in Long Beach, California. The short course included a range of topics that provided participants (1) an overview of EWN practices and example projects that promote coastal resilience, flood risk reduction and enhance ecosystem services; (2) an introduction to a diverse number of EWN solutions, which include a systems approach that incorporates the use of natural and nature-based features (NNBF); (3) a greater understanding of the application and utility of specific NNBF types (e.g., beaches/dunes, wetlands, reefs, islands, etc.) used to create EWN solutions; (4) insight into current efforts to quantify EWN “triple win” outcomes; and (5) methods for achieving project success through the incorporation of the four EWN elements. Approximately 85 individuals participated in the short course, which included 14 speakers from a diverse set of organizations that are applying EWN practices to address current and future-anticipated, issues/challenges confronting our estuarine systems. All participants in the EWN Short Course received a copy of the EWN Atlas, which served as a course book highlighting 56 EWN projects. The RAE EWN Short Course agenda for the December 13th presentations is included. Likewise, the presentations are also included for your review.

POCs

Todd Bridges, Todd.S.Bridges@usace.army.mil
Jeffrey King, Jeffrey.K.King@usace.army.mil

Introduction

Short Course Introduction: EWN – current practices, applications and example projects, Todd Bridges, Environmental Laboratory, Engineer Research and Development Center, USACE (PDF)

Coastal Wetlands: EWN Applied Research, Outcomes, and Case Studies

Wetlands and flood risk: processes, considerations, and examples, Candice Piercy, Environmental Laboratory, Engineer Research and Development Center, USACE (PDF)

Natural marsh processes and their implications in restoration efforts, Brandon Boyd, Coastal Hydraulics Laboratory, Engineer Research and Development Center, USACE (PDF)

Coastal Protection Benefits of Vegetation: A Focus on Wave Height Reduction, Mary Bryant, Coastal Hydraulics Laboratory, Engineer Research and Development Center, USACE (PDF)

Beaches and Dune Systems: EWN Applied Research, Outcomes, and Case Studies

Engineered dunes in hybrid coastal risk-reduction approaches, Jens Figlus, Texas A&M University (PDF)

Measuring the impacts of vegetation on dune erosion, Duncan Bryant, Coastal Hydraulics Laboratory, Engineer Research and Development Center, USACE (PDF)

Dune Vegetation and Evolution Modeling for EWN: Linking Remote Sensing to Habitat Change and Ecological Process, Safra Altman, Environmental Laboratory, Engineer Research and Development Center, USACE (PDF)

Other Estuarine Features: EWN Applied Research, Outcomes and Case Studies

Islands, Joe Gailani, Coastal Hydraulics Laboratory, Engineer Research and Development Center, USACE (PDF)

Mangroves, Tori Tomiczek, US Naval Academy (PDF)

Oysters – Employing Nature’s Coastal Engineers for Coastal Ecosystem and Community Resilience, Stan Rogers, Restoration Center, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA (PDF)

Organizational Thoughts and Perspectives: Considerations Pursuing EWN Initiatives in Coastal Systems

Environmental Defense Fund, Devyani Kar, Environmental Defense Fund (PDF)

US Army Corps of Engineers, Mindy Simmons, HQ Planning/Policy, USACE (PDF)

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Colette Cairns, Office of Protected Resources, National Marine Fisheries Service, NOAA (PDF)

California State Coastal Conservancy, Marilyn Latta, California State Coastal Conservancy (PDF)

Use or reproduction of any slides/graphics or portions of figures etc. found herein shall contain an acknowledgement of the author/institution and be by permission of the author.

Top